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Author Topic: extraordinary number of disk read errors  (Read 15373 times)
mddalley
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« on: June 02, 2014, 09:28:23 PM »

I have been working on creating a Support Analysis Log for my failed HDD.  The report isn't done but there are already over 37,000 read errors.  Should I still send the analysis log, or is this pretty hopeless?
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Tom
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« Reply #1 on: June 03, 2014, 12:16:31 PM »

You should immediately stop accessing that disk. If there is anything on there that you need you should clone the disk, but from the sound of it that isn't likely to work out well. What happened to the disk?

If possible do this (health log):
http://www.diydatarecovery.nl/dp_manual/guide_smartcheck.htm
Post the result.

Clone info:
http://www.diydatarecovery.nl/dp_manual/guide_clone.htm

For cloning you would need the registered version, so before you commit to that post the health log first.
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mddalley
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« Reply #2 on: June 03, 2014, 02:32:20 PM »

Well, this is what happened:  I left my laptop sleeping overnight.  In the morning I got this error message - reboot and select proper boot device.  The BIOS appeared to recognize the hard drive.  I opened the case and reseated the hard drive.
When I tried to reboot, I got this message - a disk read error occurred press control alt delete to restart.  I did that, but there was no change.  The BIOS continued to appear to recognize the hard drive.  I opened the case and reseated the hard drive again.  No change.
Next, I successfully booted to Ubuntu via a bootable USB drive. HDD does not show up, I guess because I needed to mount the drive.  However, I don't know how to do that, and decided to try another way to get at my data.
I wanted to clone my drive, but I had a few questions, so I decided to go with the Support Analysis Log first.  So here is my setup- laptop with one HDD bay that has the problem/source disk.  I have a brand new laptop HDD in an enclosure, connected by USB.  Do I need to format the new HDD first before cloning?  Do I need to make partitions to match what is on the source disk?  Will this work via USB?
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Tom
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« Reply #3 on: June 03, 2014, 03:08:46 PM »

Your scenario suggests that the disk has been bad for a while now, you just had not noticed yet. This may or may not be good, you'll have to see. At least it didn't suffer acute damage (like falling of a table), that is a good thing.

A clone is disk to disk, regardless of what's on the disks. Sector 0 is copied to sector 0, sector 1 to sector 1 etc. So volumes are of no interest, just make sure the target disk is in good working order. Also, obviously, what is on the target disk will be overwritten by what is on the source disk. Finally, the target disk must be of at least the same size as the source disk.

USB will work but there are a few potential problems:
- USB does not deal well with read errors, so try not to use USB for the source disk. USB for a target disk should be okay.
- USB is slow so it may influence the clone process in terms of speed. Not a big deal here because the source disk is in such a bad state that the cloning will likely take a long time anyway.
- USB disks may not show up in DiskPatch, the BIOS must support access to USB disks when in real mode (meaning, when not running Windows or Linux). You may need to tweak settings in the BIOS to make that work (look for "USB legacy settings" or something like that).

Take a look at the clone section of the manual and/or the clone walkthrough, it explains things nicely. If you have any further questions don't hesitate to ask.
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mddalley
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« Reply #4 on: June 03, 2014, 03:20:47 PM »

Here is the SMART report:
Detected Controllers

  Disk Controller 1
    Device Vendor . . . . . . . . . . . . . : 8086
    Device ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : 2929
    Device  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : Intel
    Device Location . . . . . . . . . . . . : Bus 0, Device 31, Function 2
    Device Ports  . . . . . . . . . . . . . : CC00-CC07, C880-C883, C800-C807, C480-C483, C400-C41F

This is all there was.  I was expecting more, but this is what showed up.  It was also surprisingly fast - given that everything else with the disk has been quite slow.

Oh, and also when I rebooted and started DP again, it gave me a MBR error.

Thank you for the specific advice about cloning in my situation.  I have read the manual and instructions several times, and will go over it again. 
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mddalley
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« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2014, 03:46:57 PM »

Would it be helpful if I posted the partial Support Analysis Log?  It got about 57% processed before I aborted it.
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mddalley
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« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2014, 03:50:25 PM »

Sorry - one more question.  From your earlier post, it sounds like the trial version isn't applicable for cloning.  Is that correct? So I guess I will wait until you see the SMART report before I buy the full version and start cloning.
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Tom
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« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2014, 04:22:57 PM »

Not good.

The health report should be much larger, and the MBR read error (if you have not seen this before) is a sign that things are rapidly going south.

I suppose all you can do now is try the clone. We have a refund policy so give it a try.

If the disk doesn't contain anything of importance you can simply throw the disk away and install a fresh one; understand that repairing this is not going to happen. It is also likely that the cloned disk will have large gaps where the source disk couldn't be read, so this is a recovery operation and not a repair. Just wanted to make that clear.

If you DO need data from the source disk and you have no backups and the data is vital, try the clone.

If you have the support analysis log, post it.
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mddalley
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« Reply #8 on: June 03, 2014, 04:36:53 PM »

I can't see the support analysis log in the DPFILES folder, so maybe since I aborted the scan it didn't complete the log.
The disk has important data that I want very much to recover.  I think the price for DiskPatch is reasonable.  But if there is nothing left to recover, can I get a refund? 
Is there any chance iRecover would be helpful in this circumstance?
Your assistance has been most valuable.  Thank you.
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Tom
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« Reply #9 on: June 03, 2014, 09:59:55 PM »

iRecover could help, but the approach is different. iRecover can also clone a disk but it clones to a file, so the disk becomes one large file. You'd need a disk that is large enough to hold that file. After the disk has been cloned to the file (the file is called an image) you can use iRecover to analyze the file and see if data can be recovered from it.

Given the fact that the source disk is in bad shape you will probably need iRecover anyway, to work with the disk that DiskPatch has cloned: if parts of the disk didn't get cloned because of read errors, normal disk access through Windows may not work, and then you'd need iRecover to work with the clone.

So it's your call.

In general, though depending on the damage, the DiskPatch clone process is more likely to copy as much data as possible. But choosing iRecover for this or DiskPatch is also a matter of taste (Windows or not), I suppose.
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mddalley
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« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2014, 09:03:00 PM »

So I've been running the Clone Disk utility since last Wednesday, I think.  The estimated progress time near the beginning of the 1st pass was about 10 days, and we're still on track for that.  It's about 66% done. 
I'm concerned about the number of sectors that have been skipped.  It has processed about 413 million sectors and skipped about 403k blocks.  I used default setting with regard to skipping blocks and block size, I believe.  To me this sounds grim.  Is there much chance at all that I will eventually get data back?  The second pass will likely take even longer, right?  If this all seems normal, I will carry on.  But if it seems like my chances are so low, I may not continue.
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Tom
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« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2014, 10:33:38 AM »

Grim indeed.

The second pass will take forever, but you don't have to let that run to completion. If pass 1 is complete most of the disk will have been copied. You can let pass 2 go on for a while to see how it goes and if it doesn't work simply abort it.

Accessing this disk after the clone is probably not going well, so you should expect to use iRecover; if normal Windows access is impossible (and it likely will be) you'll need iRecover to copy data from the clone.

But, let's take that hurdle when we get to it.
For now, yes, this may not turn out well but as you've come this far you might as well try for the whole stretch. Still, it's up to you.
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mddalley
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« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2014, 04:10:23 PM »

So I allowed the cloning to continue to the end.  I checked on it at 99% completion, and it was progressing as normal.  When I came back thinking it was done, I got this error: "Clone DataSector not found, pass 2 aborted."  I searched this forum for that error message and read the one result, but that didn't help me decide what to do next.  Can you please advise? 
I was thinking I would use iRecover to lift the data image off the clone, but I wonder if anything is there at all.
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Tom
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« Reply #13 on: June 17, 2014, 09:01:31 PM »

That error message indicates that pass 2 could not start because of a missing record of pass 1. This may be caused by a few things. One: pass 1 went fine and there is no need for pass 2, or two: the data sector that is built by pass 1 and needed for pass 2 can not be read and/or used.
In your case, scenario two seems the more likely one, though I'd like to see the log to make sure. If possible, ZIP the log file (it'll probably be rather large) and attach it to a posting here. If you're not sure which file we need, just ZIP em all.

Your idea to analyze the disk with iRecover is spot on. Give that a go and see what happens. You can use the trial version for this, it will tell you how things are.
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mddalley
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« Reply #14 on: June 18, 2014, 03:38:04 PM »

The only log file I had on the USB stick was this one from June 3 - the day I aborted the scan for the Support Analysis Log.  I started the Disk Clone on June 4, I believe, though it could possibly have been on the 3rd.
I've tried twice to post with the attached zip file but I keep getting this error: Upload folder full.  The zipped file is about 5.2 MB, which is under the size limit, so I can't tell what the problem is.
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