Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?
September 26, 2017, 10:05:08 AM
Home Help Search Login Register
News:

+  DIY DataRecovery.nl Support forum
|-+  Support
| |-+  General Data Recovery (Moderators: Tom, Joep)
| | |-+  Problem - Hard Disk Drive not being recognised
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Problem - Hard Disk Drive not being recognised  (Read 1358 times)
Joep
Developer and Support Tech
Administrator
member
*****
Posts: 1457


WWW
« Reply #15 on: July 08, 2017, 03:13:56 PM »

Quote
First my comment on quick format - no I understand that quick format is never required to recover data, but I meant as a last resort if the command did format the disk then many companies advertise something like "Restore Lost Data after Format Quickly and Easily".

Good quality data /file recovery software doesn't care how the data was lost. It ignores that basically. It will scan for file system structures and 'generate' a virtual file system based on that. Then that's translated in a directory/file structure from which you can pick folders and files to recover. A quick format at any point does not add anything to recoverability of lost data.

Less advanced file recovery software (like the famous Recuva) can't deal with volumes without a recognizable file system. In various support forums (including Piriform's own forums) I have seen people suggest to quick format a volume so Recuva could work with it. This is an extremely poor solution to work around the product's shortcomings. In fact, if you'd been using an SSD rather than a conventional disk, quick formatting will also cause Windows to issue a TRIM command to the SSD after which recoverability of data is 0%.

I have little knowledge or practical experience about swapping PCBs and such. But I'd appreciate it if you'd continue reporting on your endeavor and wish you good luck!
Logged

--
Kind regards,
Joep
3cabbage
member

Posts: 9


« Reply #16 on: August 26, 2017, 12:58:37 PM »

Hi Joep,

I found out that my controller card was a Cat 2 so I needed a replacement where I could unsolder the BIOS and replace it with my own. I found a few suppliers in Hong Kong, so I used one of them.

It has been a while since I last wrote because the first controller card PCB that I was sent wasn't the one I ordered (then they actually had the cheek to try and charge me to rectify their mistake), so I had to order another (from a different supplier).  Each took almost three weeks to arrive, but the second one was the right serial number.

Before connecting to my HDD I first tried tried using the Hyperterminal tests to see if I could get a response from the card, but I didn't so I was still unsure if it is the card causing a problem or not.

I decided to press ahead with changing the BIOS by first removing the one in the new donor card, my reasoning being if there was a problem it wouldn't damage my working BIOS.  I had seen a youtube video where they made a square of copper wire to melt the solder on all four legs of the BIOS simultaneously, so I made one using the copper out of some cast off twin and earth power cable.  It worked very well and I took the BIOS off the PCB quickly and easily, then cleaned off the excess solder from the chip socket. 

Before removing the BIOS on my own card, I realised that it was difficult to see the notch and I didn't want to replace it back to front, so I put a touch of snowpake at the end nearest the board edge.  I then proceded to remove my BIOS and all was going well until the solder was molten. I removed the soldering iron and copper and started to remove the BIOS.  Seven of the legs came out straight away, but the solder hardened on the eigth leg and it snapped off virtually flush with the encapsulation.  "Oh dear!" (or words to that effect) said I.  Luckily I had some small gauge wire and I soldered on a new leg before putting the BIOS in the new donor board and soldering it in.

After checking everything looked OK, I then screwed the board back onto the HDD, connected up and switched on.  Unfortunately, I am still getting the same original symptoms in that my PC thinks I have a USB Mass Storeage disk with four generic USB devices. 

One thing I have learnt, I am reasonably good at soldering having many years of professional practice, but with larger standard soldering equipment on the small BIOS chips that have such short non-flexible legs, if I have to do it again I will seriously consider paying the extra for someone else to swap out the BIOS.  Doing it myself cost me around 6 (8 USD$) using a donor board from Hong Kong, whereas getting someone else to do it with specialist equipment would cost around 40 (52 USD$ - and the company I saw was in USA) and probably worth the extra cost to reduce the stress.

It looks like I may not be able to get my data off at all, but I'll go away and scratch my head some more in the hope I can think of something else to try.

Thanks for all your help.

Alan
Logged
Joep
Developer and Support Tech
Administrator
member
*****
Posts: 1457


WWW
« Reply #17 on: September 09, 2017, 04:27:37 PM »

Hi,

Well no, unfortunately I do not have additional suggestions. We're more on the software / logical damage side of things.

Logged

--
Kind regards,
Joep
Pages: 1 [2] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  


Login with username, password and session length

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!